Monday 7 December 2015 by Luke Georghegan

Grammarians quietly stewing over ‘You ain’t no Muslim, bruv’ double negative


grammar pedant

Grammar pedants across the country have expressed mild discomfort with the use of a double negative in the anti terror slogan, ‘You Ain’t No Muslim, Bruv’.

The phrase, now canonised into a top trending hashtag, first appeared over the weekend as a message of solidarity amongst Londoners of all faiths and persuasions against terrorism carried out by Islamic extremists.

However, the grammatical structure of the slogan has caused furrowed brows in more bookish circles, due to its use of two forms of negation in the same sentence.

“A very worthy cause, of course. It’s almost right,” said Dr. Peter E. Dantry, president of the Oxford English Grammar Society in an interview yesterday.

“Really, it’s fine. The message is clear enough. I suppose it’s just that ‘You are not a Muslim, brother’, might have been a touch more succinct, and accurate, but never mind.”

Other observers were less charitable in their criticism. “You Ain’t No Muslim, Bruv? So he is, in fact, a Muslim? Is that what you meant to say? Then why did you say that then?” commented a bespectacled, middle aged man who declined to give his name.

“I shall not be confirming my identity, only my dismay at the seemingly inexorable decline of our once proud linguistic tradition.

“Besides, Mum tells me I shouldn’t talk to strangers,” he added, before returning to the trolley collection depot.

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