Wednesday 12 November 2014

European space robot Philae criticised for parking in comet’s disabled bay


Rosetta landing disabled space

European robot probe Philae has been criticised for parking in a disabled bay on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, simply because it was more convenient.

The robot made history at just past 4pm by being the first European space mission to willfully ignore signs and park in a place reserved for blue badge holders.

Disabled rights activist Simon Williams told us, “I don’t care if they’ve travelled millions of miles and if the disabled bay was empty – who is to say someone who needs won’t be along in a minute?”

“Sure, they wanted to be near the front of the comet because it was ‘more convenient’, but it’s reserved for disabled drivers for a reason you know.”

“What if I fancied popping out to take pictures of the comet’s landscape and to analyse its chemical composition? What then?”

“What am I supposed to do, park at the other end of the comet and walk?”

“Their arrogance is just astounding.”

Philae makes history

The European Space agency have said they will move the robot really soon, as they were only popping onto the comet for ‘five minutes’.

A spokesperson told reporters, “Look, we’ve travelled 6.4 billion kilometres to get there, I don’t think parking one space nearer to the front is a big deal really.”

“Yes, technically we shouldn’t have parked there, but it’s not like us being there for a couple of minutes will make a difference, is it.”

“Plus I’ve got a bad leg, look, I’m limping and everything.”

There are currently witterings below - why not add your own?

Previous post:

Next post: